The Latest

mothernaturenetwork:

Diversity makes us more creative, smarter peopleBeing around people who are different might be a challenge, but it’s worth it. Step out of your bubble!
Oct 1, 2014 / 102 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

Diversity makes us more creative, smarter people
Being around people who are different might be a challenge, but it’s worth it. Step out of your bubble!

mothernaturenetwork:

Why living small means living happily ever afterHere are just 4 simple reasons you should consider downsizing.
Oct 1, 2014 / 153 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

Why living small means living happily ever after
Here are just 4 simple reasons you should consider downsizing.

mothernaturenetwork:

50 ways to reuse your garbageFrom fruit peels and coffee grounds to pantyhose and pill bottles, here’s how to save money and treat your trash like treasure.
Oct 1, 2014 / 194 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

50 ways to reuse your garbage
From fruit peels and coffee grounds to pantyhose and pill bottles, here’s how to save money and treat your trash like treasure.

anarchei:

Anarchy: The Crazy Notion You Own Yourself
Sep 29, 2014 / 355 notes

anarchei:

Anarchy: The Crazy Notion You Own Yourself

Sep 29, 2014 / 156 notes

anarchei:

Keynesian vs Austrian Economics

Sep 29, 2014 / 85 notes

anarchei:

War On The Streets


2014 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Sixth Lowest on Record: Arctic sea ice coverage continued its below-average trend this year as the ice declined to its annual minimum. Learn more: go.nasa.gov/1wGz5bB #EarthRightNow #ActOnClimate
Sep 29, 2014 / 446 notes

2014 Arctic Sea Ice Minimum Sixth Lowest on Record: Arctic sea ice coverage continued its below-average trend this year as the ice declined to its annual minimum. Learn more: go.nasa.gov/1wGz5bB #EarthRightNow #ActOnClimate

One day our homes will be smart, but we have a long way to go. Here’s how we’ll get there
Stacey Higginbotham, gigaom.com
Right now, most people don’t want a smart home. And while about 13 percent of people have an internet-connected device that isn’t a computer, phone or tablet in their homes, according to research from Parks Associates, the marketing of the smart h…
Sep 29, 2014 / 9 notes

One day our homes will be smart, but we have a long way to go. Here’s how we’ll get there
Stacey Higginbotham, gigaom.com

Right now, most people don’t want a smart home. And while about 13 percent of people have an internet-connected device that isn’t a computer, phone or tablet in their homes, according to research from Parks Associates, the marketing of the smart h…

Aug 7, 2014 / 5,422 notes

fastcompany:

theenergyissue:

The Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) Building is the First Fully Algae-Powered Architecture

Operating successfully for over a year, the Bio Intelligent Quotient (B.I.Q.) building in Hamburg, Germany is the first to be fully powered by algae. The building is covered with 0.78-inch thick panels—200 square meters in total—filled with algae from the Elbe River and pumped full of carbon dioxide and nutrients. The panels, which display the bright green algae, are not only aesthetic, but performative. When sunlight hits the “bioreactor” panels, photosynthesis causes the microorganisms to multiply and give off heat. The warmth is then captured for heating water or storing in saline tanks underground, while algae biomass is harvested and dried. It can either be converted to biogas, or used in secondary pharmaceutical and food products. Residents have no heating bills and the building currently reduces overall energy needs by 50%. 

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mothernaturenetwork:

6 unexpected products made from hempThis versatile fiber can keep you looking good or speed you down the highway.
Aug 6, 2014 / 139 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

6 unexpected products made from hemp
This versatile fiber can keep you looking good or speed you down the highway.

anarchei:

Tariq Ramadan
Note: You can purchase a printed copy of this poster in various sizes from my RedBubble store.
I spent way too much time on this one, and I’m still not entirely happy with it. I got this from a quote I reblogged recently.
Project: Posters
Jul 12, 2014 / 331 notes

anarchei:

Tariq Ramadan


Note: You can purchase a printed copy of this poster in various sizes from my RedBubble store.

I spent way too much time on this one, and I’m still not entirely happy with it. I got this from a quote I reblogged recently.

Project: Posters


mothernaturenetwork:

Cycling across the country barefoot in search of a simpler lifeRob Greenfield’s Goodfluence bike tour promotes the ‘being’ in ‘human being’ while also encouraging gardens in urban spaces.
Jul 9, 2014 / 117 notes

mothernaturenetwork:

Cycling across the country barefoot in search of a simpler life
Rob Greenfield’s Goodfluence bike tour promotes the ‘being’ in ‘human being’ while also encouraging gardens in urban spaces.

fastcompany:

Can Jim Mason solve the developing world’s power problems with a temperamental machine that runs on garbage?
It is a challenge just to find the door to All Power Labs, an upstart alternative-energy concern in the industrial wastelands of far west Berkeley, California, and it’s not unusual for visitors to circle the block several times before realizing that the only way in is through a rolling gate with a small sign. Beyond that is what appears to be a scrap yard filled with old shipping containers and rusty hunks of metal. Welding torches spark and flare; walnut fragments litter the ground. And all around are iterations of APL’s main product, the Power Pallet, a contraption consisting of a large silver barrel on top of various other metal parts, all connected with pipes and hoses. It looks like something you’d use to cook meth. In reality, the Power Pallet is a small refinery, which converts biomass (nutshells, wood chips, corncobs) to hydrogen-rich gas, attached to a four-cylinder engine, which burns the gas to generate electricity. The weirdest part: It is, potentially, the most important and transformative energy product that no one has heard of.
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Jul 6, 2014 / 133 notes

fastcompany:

Can Jim Mason solve the developing world’s power problems with a temperamental machine that runs on garbage?

It is a challenge just to find the door to All Power Labs, an upstart alternative-energy concern in the industrial wastelands of far west Berkeley, California, and it’s not unusual for visitors to circle the block several times before realizing that the only way in is through a rolling gate with a small sign. Beyond that is what appears to be a scrap yard filled with old shipping containers and rusty hunks of metal. Welding torches spark and flare; walnut fragments litter the ground. And all around are iterations of APL’s main product, the Power Pallet, a contraption consisting of a large silver barrel on top of various other metal parts, all connected with pipes and hoses. It looks like something you’d use to cook meth. In reality, the Power Pallet is a small refinery, which converts biomass (nutshells, wood chips, corncobs) to hydrogen-rich gas, attached to a four-cylinder engine, which burns the gas to generate electricity. The weirdest part: It is, potentially, the most important and transformative energy product that no one has heard of.

Read More>

Jul 2, 2014 / 129 notes
fastcompany:

A world where food is plentiful and drugs are personalized may not be as far off as it seems.
What world-changing scientific discoveries might we see by 2025? Will we have more energy technologies that move us away from fossil fuels? Will there be cures for cancer and other diseases? How will we get around and communicate?
To make some predictions, the Thomson Reuters IP & Science unit looked at two sorts of data: current scientific journal literature and patent applications. Counting citations and other measures of buzz, they identified 10 hot fields, then made specific forecasts for each.
“A powerful outcome of studying scientific literature and patent data is that it gives you a window into the future—insight that isn’t always found in the public domain,” says Basil Moftah, president of the IP & Science business, which sells scientific database products. “We estimate that these will be in effect in another 11 years.”
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Jul 1, 2014 / 131 notes

fastcompany:

A world where food is plentiful and drugs are personalized may not be as far off as it seems.

What world-changing scientific discoveries might we see by 2025? Will we have more energy technologies that move us away from fossil fuels? Will there be cures for cancer and other diseases? How will we get around and communicate?

To make some predictions, the Thomson Reuters IP & Science unit looked at two sorts of data: current scientific journal literature and patent applications. Counting citations and other measures of buzz, they identified 10 hot fields, then made specific forecasts for each.

“A powerful outcome of studying scientific literature and patent data is that it gives you a window into the future—insight that isn’t always found in the public domain,” says Basil Moftah, president of the IP & Science business, which sells scientific database products. “We estimate that these will be in effect in another 11 years.”

Read More>